Wrist-on with Samsung’s Gear Live, one of the first Android Wear watches | Ars Technica

Wrist-on with Samsung’s Gear Live, one of the first Android Wear watches | Ars Technica.

The Gear Live is Samsung’s first Android Wear watch It’s compatible with Android phone running Android 4.3 or 4.4. And we like it. It has the same AMOLED display as the Gear 2. Samsung says the phone should get about a day of battery life. The Gear Live costs $199. The big plus for us at BayLibre is that it is the first Samsung phone to be compatible with any Android device.

Google I/O 2014 Recap… Android L, Android TV, Auto, More! – YouTube

Google I/O 2014 Recap… Android L, Android TV, Auto, More! – YouTube.

Google IO 2014 summary by Tekzilla: over 1 billion active users of Android worldwide, L version of the OS announced with 5000 new APIs (and so what 🙂 ) and Dalvik going away . They launch project Volta which goal is to improve then battery life for Android powered devices.

With a $649 price tag, Amazon’s new phone is playing with fire | Ars Technica

With a $649 price tag, Amazon’s new phone is playing with fire | Ars Technica.

According to Ars Technica, at one point Amazon was selling half of Android tablets thanks to their mid range-low price strategy. They discuss here the new strategy used for the Fire phone positioned in price in the premium device space while competing in terms of features with the MotoX.

Google’s Nest thermostat hacked with Linux — backdoor enabled on device

Google’s Nest thermostat hacked with Linux — backdoor enabled on device.

The story of how GTV Hacker attaqued the google TV device and managed to boot with unsigned code. Read unsecure code for unsigned code here:-)
They managed the same exploit with Nest thermostat based on an OMAP platform. Again this raises the issue of the Internet of Things and the security. This article claimed that the release of their smoke detector was delayed due to these security issues. 

Russian gov to dump x86, bake own 64-bit ARM chips – reports • The Register

Russian government wants to ditch Intel and AMD processors in favour of a locally-developed ARM effort. Russian companies are banding together to develop to be called “Baikal” that will use ARM’s 64-bit kernel Cortex A-57 as its base design, offer at least eight cores, be built with a 28nm process and run at 2GHz.
Cavium’s staff includes folks from failed ARM server chipmaker Calxeda, who told us they feel enough enterprise software runs on ARM. That’s no longer quite such a problem. If Russia follows this path, and the rules of open source, the problem could disappear entirely. 

Russian gov to dump x86, bake own 64-bit ARM chips – reports • The Register.

Digital Summit: How to Secure Connected Homes? | MIT Technology Review

Digital Summit: How to Secure Connected Homes? | MIT Technology Review.

Nest: a self learning thermostat is connected to the Internet. August: a Bluetooth enabled door lock lets you enter your home when it recognizes your smartphone. While Internet of Things invaeds our home, the best way to keep us safe is simply through keeping some of these devices OFF the internet.

Heartbleed Reminded Us that Coders Aren’t Perfect. So Call in the Automated Inspectors. | MIT Technology Review

Heartbleed Reminded Us that Coders Aren’t Perfect. So Call in the Automated Inspectors. | MIT Technology Review.

Where Simson L. Garfinkel explains that any software implementation is inherently unsecure. For instance Heartbleed, the bug within SSL, terrorized the Internet community earlier this year. The main issue was related with the C language Heartbleed was written into. The flow was in a ‘goto’ statement.The ‘many eyes’ theory states that if code is open source, many people review it and therefore it is secured against ill written code (including security issues). Even this theory is not enough because Heartbleed was open source. Instead Garfinkel advocates using C# and Java and automated testing.

What is your opinion?

 

If Robots Drove, How Much Safer Would Roads Be? – NYTimes.com

If Robots Drove, How Much Safer Would Roads Be? – NYTimes.com.

The article explains that 93% of accidents are caused by human error. When safety belts were installed, the number of fatalities on the road decreased by 50%. Two scholars have studied the potential impact of sself driving cars and they estimate that another 50% of casualties could be avoided thanks to these robots.

Linux mini-drones jump, flip, climb, and fly ·  LinuxGizmos.com

Linux mini-drones jump, flip, climb, and fly ·  LinuxGizmos.com.

As always we love the Parrot products: two mini drones which were demonstrated at CES back in January. We have seen their demonstration and it was very impressive, see http://baylibre.com/cool-flying-dancing-drones-from-parrot-at-ces/. They are now available for sale. There are two models: Jumping Sumo and Rolling Spider.


They both feature embedded Linux.