Linux Kernel v4.13 released, our contributions

Linux Kernel v4.13 released

BayLibre has continued our contribution to the Linux community as seen with this new version of Linux Kernel v4.13, released on Sept 3rd.

For this version we supplied:

  • multiple team members
  • many work hours
  • several cups of coffee
  • and a few pastries

An excellent summary of this release can be found at KernelNewbies.

Here is a summary of our contributions, organized by SoC family and a summary graph of contributions by developer.

Amlogic SoC family:

  • Add S905x based libretech-cc “Le Potato” board support (Succesfully backed on kickstarter)
  • Fix PWM for AO Domain
  • Add HDMI Nodes for more boards (p212, p230, Khadas VIM, Wetek Play2)
  • Support for the SPICC controller added
  • And missing GXL pinctrl pins

TI DaVinci SoC family:

  • da850: Enable CPPI 4.1 DMA to USB OTG controller
  • da850: vpif: adaptions for DT support

Various

  • Fix for Mediatek MMC driver

 

 

Linux v4.12 released, BayLibre contributions

We are happy to announce the Linux v4.12 release on July the 2nd.

Baylibre is pleased to have contributed with the Linux Kernel community to this new version.

An excellent summary of this release can be found at KernelNewbies.

Here is a summary of our contributions, organized by SoC family and a summary graph of contributions by developer.

Amlogic SoC family:

  • Clocks fixups and exports
  • GXL pinctrl fixups and more pins declarations
  • GXBB more pins declarations
  • Add MALI Node for GXBB and GXL
  • Add MALI Clocks support
  • Odroid-c2: Fix USB Hub and and GPIO pin labels
  • Add ADC Laddred buttons on P230 and Q200
  • Add support for HDMI Output on GXBB, GXL and GXM

 

TI DaVinci SoC family:

  • musb for da8xx
    • Add clock for CPPI 4.1 DMA engine
    • CPPI 4.1 DMA fixes
    • Detect aborted transfers
    • Add support of CPPI 4.1 DMA controller to DA8xx
  • Enable ohci for omapl138 lcdk
  • Add support for SATA on dm8168-evm
    • model the SATA refclk
    • add con_id for the SATA clock
    • add and enable the SATA node
    • davinci_all_defconfig: enable SATA modules
  • Fix da850 vpif display pinx
  • Fix davinci SPI DMA handling

Various

  • ASoC: add es7134 DAC driver and bindings
  • Enhancements to the DW-HDMI bridge driver

 

stats-v4.11-v4.12

 

Zephyr 1.8.0 released, BayLibre contributions

The new Zephyr 1.8.0 version released!

The 1.8 OS Zephyr Project version was launched on June 15th 2017.

To read more click here

— Zephyr Project (@ZephyrIoT) 16 juin 2017

A full changelog of this release are available on the project release notes page.

Thanks to major enhancements, it is now easier for contributors to submit pull requests by simplifying and streamlining the review and acceptance process.

Now supported in Zephyr 1.8 version :

Along the following STM32 Microcontrollers features :

  • Flash support for the STM32L4 family, merged in a common driver with the STM32F4 family driver
  • Support for the STM32F469XI SoC
  • Support for the STM32F407 SoC
  •  for the STM32L496 SoC
  • and for the STM32L432XC SoC

 

 

Startup Weekend – Baylibre Sponsor SWNSA

BayLibre Sponsor SWNSA

La 5ème édition du Startup Weekend Nice Sophia Antipolis, aura lieu le 23 juin prochain à Nice.

Vous avez toujours souhaité créer votre propre entreprise?

Les idées fusent dans votre tête mais vous ne savez pas comment commencer?

Vous souhaitez obtenir des conseils d’experts et des retours d’expérience?

Vous voulez commencer rapidement?

La Startup Weekend Nice Sophia Antipolis est faite pour vous !

Le principe Startup weekend

Un weekend, soit 54 h, pour créer son projet de Startup!

Les participants doivent, avec l’aide d’experts, rendre leur projet viable.

Par la suite ils devront le présenter devant un jury, qui fera une sélection.

Les gagnants remportent des lots d’accompagnement pour les aider à se lancer concrètement dans leurs projets de création.

 

BayLibre sera enchanté et fier de pouvoir partager ses connaissances ainsi que son expérience et participer au lancement d’une jeune pousse.

Venez nous rejoindre nombreux au SWNSA Epitech Nice du 23 au 25 juin prochain.

Pour en savoir plus http://swnsa.fr/

Baylibre at the Innovation summit by Sierra Wireless

BayLibre will attend the Innovation Summit by Sierra Wireless, on June 13th, at the Eiffel Tower Novotel in Paris.

It’s a great opportunity to mingle with BayLibre and other industry experts in the IoT space.

BayLibre and Innovation

BayLibre is passionately involved in technology and innovation. Supporting clients such as Google, Texas Instruments, Fossil Group and so much more.

We are experts in low-level programming and development, on Linux embedded system and Android.

We are ready to commit ourselves to bring our support, competence and skills to your IoT projects.

Do not hesitate to contact us before, during and after the summit.

Discover some more about the Summit !

BayLibre at the innovation and technology fair

BayLibre will attend the Vivatech Innovation and Technology Fair, June 15th through the 17th, in Paris, Porte des Expositions. Come join us, we look forward to meeting you and sharing with you.

Innovation and technology are at the heart of BayLibre. We pride ourselves on our expertise in low-level software development, open source software, and world-class embedded Linux and Android know-how. We apply these skills and knowledge to our client projects in IoT, camera, mobile, wearables, health, automotive and consumer electronics markets.

We could not miss the opportunity to go to this event that brings together other industry experts and game-changers like us. We hope to see you soon, do not hesitate to contact us, we will be happy to have a chat with you.

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Blocks + BayLibre smartwatch developer

BayLibre is collaborating with Blocks as smartwatch developer.

At BayLibre, our engineers get to work on some of the most interesting technology in world. We’re equally lucky to get to work with some of the coolest companies on the planet.

BayLibre, Blocks smartwatch developer

Earlier this month Blocks announced that they are collaborating with BayLibre to develop embedded software for their forthcoming modular smart watch. We’ve been working with Blocks for quite a while and we’re thrilled to speak more about this engagement publicly!

While BayLibre has collaborated with Blocks on various parts of the embedded software stack, the part that has been talked about the most has been the port of Zephyr to the STM32L4 family of SoCs.

Blocks has been ultra-savvy about using Open Source software where it makes sense in their product, and as a result they will get to claim the honor of being the first CE device in the world to ship with Zephyr OS on board.

Without going into too much detail, Zephyr forms a critical part of the component responsible for managing the modular parts of the watch. The brain of the system remains Android-based as outlined in a Kickstarter update by Blocks.

We’re big fans of open source software, emerging technologies and cool products here at BayLibre. We’ve managed to work on all three while supporting Blocks as they move closer and closer to their ship date. We’re looking forward to seeing this seriously stylish wrist wear out in the wild!

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Linux v4.11 released, BayLibre contributions

The Linux v4.11 release was made on April 30th.

An excellent summary of this release can be found at KernelNewbies, and below is a summary of our contributions, organized by SoC family and a summary graph of contributions by developer.

Amlogic SoC family:

  • ADC laddered keys for P200 board
  • Export HDMI clocks
  • Add HDMI HPD/DDC pins functions

New boards:

  • Wetek Play (S905)
  • Wetek Hub (S905)

TI DaVinci SoC family:

  • musb for da8xx
    • Manage CPPI 4.1 DMA interrupt in DSPS
    • Clean up
    • Detect aborted transfers
    • Fix host mode suspend
    • Add support of suspend / resume
    • Remove CPPI 3.0 quirk and methods
  • Enable ohci for omapl138 lcdk
  • Add support for SATA on da850-lcdk
    • model the SATA refclk
    • add con_id for the SATA clock
    • add and enable the SATA node
    • ahci-da850: un-hardcode the MPY bits
    • ahci-da850: add a workaround for controller instability
    • davinci_all_defconfig: enable SATA modules
    • ahci-da850: implement a workaround for the softreset quirk
    • ahci-da850: add device tree match table
  • Fix VGA output on da850-lcdk
    • add the vga-bridge node
    • add support for TI ths8135
  • Fix davinci: vpif_capture

 

Linux Kernel Testing: Intro to kernelci.org

This is the first article in a series about automation, testing and validation of the Linux kernel.

The kernelci.org project aims to improve the quality of the mainline Linux kernel by improving testing and validation across the wide variety of diverse hardware platforms that run Linux.

There are soimage many different devices and platforms that run Linux, and Linux kernel development is moving so quickly that it is difficult to ensure that any given platform will remain working and stable with each Linux version.  As an example, the chart here shows the growth in the number of 32-bit ARM based devices supported by Linux, with the total number of unique devices as of v4.11 just shy of 1400!  That doesn’t even count the growing number of 64-bit ARM devices or any of the other architectures like x86 or MIPS.

With such an incredible range of supported hardware, how can the Linux kernel community continue to ensure that all of this hardware remains well supported and evolves with the rest of the Linux kernel?boards1

The kernelci.org project set out to help solve that problem.

During the development cycle of the Linux kernel, whenever there are changes to the source-code repository, the kernel is built in a wide variety of configurations for several different architectures. Today, there are over 270 different build configurations across 4 architectures (x86, MIPS, ARM and ARM64.)

After a successful build, the kernel images are made available to the several distributed labs for testing. Due to the diversity of hardware that runs linux, no one lab is going to have all the hardware, so kernelci.org was designed for distributed testing. When builds are completed, each lab can download the images for the hardware available, and perform the testing. Currently there are 8 active labs contributing a total of more than 250 unique hardware platforms across 4 unique architectures.

BayLibre’s Kevin Hilman is a founding developer of the kernelci.org project, and today, BayLibre has the largest lab contributing results from over 80 unique boards across 25 unique SoC families and performing thousands of tests each day.

If you have hardware you’d like to see tested with the latest Linux kernel in the kernelci.org project, feel free to contact us.  We can help guide you through setting up your own lab, or you could just send us your hardware and we can add it to our lab.

Want to know even more?

For a more in-depth overview, Kevin gave an overview talk of the kernelci.org project at the 2016 edition of the Kernel Recipes conference in Paris.  Slides are available online and the full talk was recorded and available right here:

 

 

 

3D Graphics on mainline Linux

During the ELC Showcase event, BayLibre showed, among other demos, Quake III Arena running fully accelerated on an Odroid-C2 powered by the Amlogic S905 SoC.

This particular demo was running the lastest Linux 4.10 release with some in-development patches for HDMI Support, Audio and Mali acceleration that will certainly go into the next Linux releases.

The AmLogic S905 embeds an ARM Mali-450 MP3 GPU running at 750MHz.

The technical showcase poster is available as PDF Version.